Thursday, 30 November 2017

5 ways to use pomegranate leaves for food, tea and good health.


Did you know that you could use the leaves of your pomegranate tree, not just the fruit? 

  1. Use young leaves as a salad green.
  2. Use young leaves in a green smoothie or juice.
  3. Use young leaves as a spinach alternative - curries, pasta sauces, soups ...
  4. Make a leaf tea - fresh or dried.
  5. Make a paste from the leaf and put it on eczema directly.

Amongst other things, pomegranate leaf tea is good to:

  • drink just before bed for a good sleep
  • drink to soothe stomach and ease digestion issues.
  • drink (with tulsi) for coughs
You can also boil down a pomegranate tea to 1/4 of the liquid and use it on cold sores and mouth ulcers. 



While the leaves, the flowers, rinds, seeds and roots (see caution below) are all edible, typically pomegranate is grown for it's fruit - the sweet-tart fruit that is full of large dark edible seeds. It is prized for it's health-giving anti-oxidant properties. 

It can however take 5-6 years before the tree fruits well. So don't just wait. Respectfully harvest young soft leaves from the shrub. This actually helps to keep the shrub in good form. 

Consider perhaps growing a hedge of pomegranate. Your regular trimmings to keep it in shape become your food - and actually can easily be planted straight into the ground to make new plants. It makes a great living fence and also a potted plant. 

Pomegranate is not fussy about soil.  It's actually quite a hardy plant but very ornamental. I have one growing just off my verandah. The leaves are glossy and attractive, the flowers are beautiful and the fruit too is quite amazing - in looks, taste and healthiness.



Pomegrante (Punica granatum) was originally from Persia and Greece. It grows well in the Mediterranean. It likes hot and dry summers and sets more fruit if it gets a cooler winter. I can successfully grow it here in the subtropics, although I doubt I get as much fruit as in other areas - which is why I am looking at it's lovely leaves.



Plants are so amazing. I love learning about all the different ways we can use the diversity of trees in our edible gardens. They have so many benefits for us, and the garden system.

Caution: The root or bark of pomegranate are considered medicinal and because they contain alkaloids and need to be carefully consumed. The key is to not eat lots of this part - stick with the fruits and leavesHere's a detailed overview of the medicinal uses: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4007340/. 

Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.



NEW ONLINE COURSE
I've recently launched my 6 week online course: THE INCREDIBLE EDIBLE GARDEN. Welcome to the wonderfully international group attending the inaugural program. The next starting date is January 28. http://www.thegoodlifeschool.net.  Gift Cards can be purchased  - click the link on the sidebar.

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Saturday, 25 November 2017

How do you eat and use your Hollyhock?


Hollyhock is completely edible - leaves, roots, flowers, seeds - not just an amazing looking flower, common in many cottage gardens. It's a valuable medicinal plant too and can be use in natural homemade skin care.

Who would have thought?  Hollyhock is a really useful and hardy self-seeding plant in a diverse polycultural garden that adds so much beauty too. 

Did you also know that many other common flowers are edible - Gardenia, Gladiolus, Pansy, Hibiscus, Fuchsia, Impatiens and Jasmine flowers are also edible.

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) is a direct relation of Marshmallow and can be used interchangeably for that herb. The difference is that Hollyhocks have woodier and tougher roots making them less palatable than Marshmallow's softer roots.


So, how do you use Hollyhock?


1. Eat Hollyhock leaves

The leaves of Hollyhock can be used as a spinach. Choose the younger softer ones.


2. Eat Hollyhock flowers

The flowers of Hollyhock are edible and can be added to salads.


3. Hollyhock to sooth dry skin - face and body

Put flowers in warm water, crush a little and apply to dry or flaky skin on your face. You can add them to your bath too to soothe dry skin.


4. Make a Cold Infused Hollyhock Tea

Mashmallow and Hollyhock flowers, leaves and roots reduce pain and inflammation. They are good as a healing tea. Cold infused medicinal tea to soothe the respiratory tract, sore throat, dry cough, stomach issues and urinary tract inflammation. Note: do not boil this tea as it will loose lots of the healing properties. To make a cold infused tea, gather a handful of fresh flowers or leaves (dried is OK too) and place in a plunger, or wrap in a cheesecloth and tie with string as a homemade teabag. Leave overnight. Refrigerate and use within a day or two.


5. Make a Hollyhock Poultice

Hollyhock leaves can also be made into a poultice for chapped skin, splinters, and painful swellings. The leaves are quite thick so sometimes you might need to lightly steam them first to make them more flexible. Put the leaves on the affected area while the are still warm and strap it on for an hour or so.




Growing Hollyhock

Hollyhocks readily self-seed in the garden. They’re very drought resistant and do well in poor and hard soils. If you want to manage their self-seeding capabilities, remove the flowers before they drop the seeds.

My daughter introduced me to Hollyhock initially. I'd thought they were just flowers, not multi-functional. I'm so glad she asked to plant them.

Another bonus is that Hollyhock flowers are a loved by bees and are a host plant for Painted Lady Butterflies. Hummingbirds like them too!

Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.



NEW ONLINE COURSE
I've recently launch my 6 week online course: THE INCREDIBLE EDIBLE GARDEN. Welcome to the wonderfully international group attending the inaugural program. You are welcome to join this week. After then, the next enrolments will open on HJan 28. http://www.thegoodlifeschool.net.  Gift Cards can be purchased  - click the link on the sidebar.

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Subscribe to my newsletter to receive my mini-guide - 12 Tips for a Thriving Edible Garden:



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If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Propagate Rosemary with Ease (4 min film): Our Permaculture Life, Morag Gamble



Learn how to simply propagate Rosemary- the wonderfully hardy, aromatic and versatile herb. 


Rosemary is one of the most popular herbs grown by gardeners around the world. It is a perennial culinary and medicinal herb - excellent in a dry spot in your garden.

Watch my new short film (4 mins) to find out two simple methods to make many plants from one. 

Do this and you'll never need to buy rosemary again. Taking cuttings from rosemary, and other herbs, is easy and rewarding, and gives you a constant supply.


Christmas is coming soon and there's still enough time to grow some rosemary gifts. Perhaps there's some other plants too that you could also propagate in interesting upcycled pots.

Rosemary is great in so many meals, but it's also excellent for your hair. You can read my recent blogpost for more information about how rosemary helps promote healthy hair. http://our-permaculture-life.blogspot.com.au/2017/10/7-ways-that-rosemary-promotes-healthy.html


Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.



NEW ONLINE COURSE
I've recently launch my 6 week online course: THE INCREDIBLE EDIBLE GARDEN. Welcome to the wonderfully international group attending the inaugural program. The next start date is 28 January http://www.thegoodlifeschool.net.  Gift Cards coming soon!

www.thegoodlifeschool.net


Subscribe to Morag Gamble's Newsletter to receive my mini-guide to an abundant garden - 12 Tips for a Thriving Edible Garden:



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To receive direct notification of all my films, you can subscribe my YouTube channel. Just click the red subscribe button on my YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/c/moraggambleourpermaculturelife


Thank you to my Patreon community:

If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Everlasting kale



My Tuscan kale (Brassica oleraceajust keeps growing, and growing! 

For years I have simply kept adding compost and mulch around it, and harvesting its lower leaves. It is healthy, thriving and a source of abundant greens for so many dishes. I also take cuttings and make new plants super easily (see pics below). 


I eat Tuscan kale in just about everything - curries, soups, pasta sauces, salads, 'eggy-bakes', omelettes. It is more tender and tasty than curly kale. It also makes wonderful kale chips. I made a little film about how to do this: 



When you are choosing where to plant it, it's a good idea to keep in mind that Tuscan Kale grows to about 60-90 cms, and to consider it more a perennial plant than an annual. Because it goes up, I often have other things planted under and around it to utilise this niche.

Tuscan Kale is also known as Dinosaur kale. My 4yo son loves this name! But this popular Italian plant has many other names too - Lacinato kale, cavolo nero, black cabbage, Tuscan cabbage, Italian kale, black kale, flat back cabbage and palm tree kale.



So, to keep your Tuscan kale growing for the longest time ....
  1. harvest the lower leaves regularly, not the growing tip.
  2. keep adding compost 
  3. keep adding mulch
  4. carefully snip off the new shoots from the 'trunk' and plant directly into the garden

Here's how to do it....


Look along the trunk of the kale to see if any new shoots have formed. Here on my kale you can see many significant sizes shoots forming around the base. 

Carefully slice of one of the shoots close to the trunk, without disturbing the trunk.

Plant directly into well prepared soil in the garden or pot. Voila - a new Tuscan Kale plant ready for many more years of harvest!

Kale is such an amazing plant. Before it became the popular 'superfood' I loved it for how easy it is to grow, how hardy it is and how much food I am able to harvest. 

It's great for veggie gardens and verges, backyards and balconies, school gardens and allotments.

Thanks Kale!! 

Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.


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If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Thursday, 16 November 2017

15 Great Uses for the Common Powder Puff Plant in a Permaculture Garden


Calliandra (Calliandra haematocephala) is popular and attractive garden plant grown for it's beautiful powder puff flowers BUT did you know that Calliandra is so much more than it's good looks?

Calliandra is:
  1. a fast growing legume
  2. a fabulous chop and drop mulch
  3. an excellent food forest shade plant
  4. a useful hedge or screen plant - coppices well
  5. a pioneer plant in a permaculture food forest - helping to get the systems started 
  6. excellent fuelwood for small fires
  7. used for intercrop hedgerows in agroforesty systems
  8. valuable supplement forage for ruminant livestock
  9. an accessible source of leaf meal protein for laying hens - pods are also high protein
  10. useful in land rehabilitation
  11. an excellent erosion control plant
  12. a green manure
  13. a pollen source for honey production
  14. attractive to butterflies and birds too (flowers)
  15. a host for lac insect (Laccifer lacca) for shellac production 


Calliandra is a hardy plant that grows well in warm-humid climates. It can withstand dry conditions, although may become semi-deciduous if the dry season is extensive. It grows 3-5 metres, but can be hedged. 


It is easily propagated by stem cuttings or seeds. Once you have one plant, you can keep making more, and sharing them widely.


It was originally from the humid and sub-humid regions of Central America and Mexico.


There are many varieties of Calliandra. The main variety recommended for agroforestry is Calliandra calothyrsus but the values of the common garden plant, Calliandra haematocephala, are also very high.


References: 
http://www.fao.org/ag/agp/agpc/doc/publicat/gutt-shel/x5556e09.htm
http://www.tropicalforages.info/key/Forages/Media/Html/Calliandra_calothyrsus.htm
http://www.theorganicfarmer.org/Articles/plant-calliandra-fodder-and-soil-fertility

Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.


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If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Eat your hedge!


This hedge is delicious!

Today we harvested kilos of fruit from one of the berry plants we hedge. Jaboticaba (Plinia cauliflora), otherwise known as the Brazilian grapetree, has fruit like grapes - sweet, round, juicy and delicious!

Jaboticaba is great as a hedge but also in a pot, in a food forest, on a verge, in community garden or school garden - a neat, hardy and delicious tree.

I have a few Jaboticabas in my home garden. They are slow growing and reasonably small still, just a couple of metres tall, but that's as big as I want them to get otherwise the fruits are out of reach. It will be getting a haircut soon.


Other fruit trees I hedge are things like Acerola Cherry (Malpighia emarginata), Grumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis) and Riberry (Syzygium luehmannii). Their dense foliage, shiny leaves, interesting flowers make a great hedge and it means I can better access the fruit.

I really love the idea of making every part of the garden productive and delicious. There are a lot of hedge plants that provide nothing but a screen.  It's such a great idea to add extra value to it - food, habitat, mulch ....



I really like to eat the fruit of Jaboticaba fresh. I like the pop it makes when you bite into it followed by the burst of sweetness. I typically spit out the thickish skin, which is a little tart tasting, but sometimes I eat that too.



After harvesting the fruit only lasts a few days so depending on the harvest size, it could be necessary to make jam, cordial, wine, tarts or liquer. 


Jaboticaba as a small hedge:


  • Jaboticaba responds well to being trimmed.
  • Jaboticaba keeps it's leaves right down to the ground.
  • Jaboticaba's leaves stay looking shiny and welcoming in both the wet and dry seasons.
  • It has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

I like Jaboticaba at the entrance to my garden because:


  • The plant delineates where the footpath to my house is.
  • I see it everyday and can and keep watch for when the flowers are forming - it reminds me to keep an eye out for the fruit.
  • I see when the fruit is ripe so I can harvest it before the birds get to it.



What edible hedges do you/could you eat?

  • What plants work best for this in your climate? 
  • What is your favourite edible hedge?



Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.



Subscribe to Morag Gamble's Newsletter to receive my PDF - 12 Tips for a Thriving Edible Garden:





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Thank you to my Patreon community:

If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Do you eat your fig leaves? Here's 5 ways to prepare them.



My fig tree (Ficus carica) is sprouting an abundance of soft large tender leaves at the moment. It'll be a while till there are any figs ready, and to be honest, in this climate (subtropical), the amount of figs I can harvest is quite small.  

I have placed the fig tree in my landscape design to be close to the chicken house. This way, everyday I see how the fruits are going and can harvest them before the birds. 

My daughter and I love fresh  figs and we delight eating the few we get right there and then in the garden. In actual fact, I don't think a fig has every reached our house.

Anyway, I was standing there looking at this fig tree the other day and thinking how nice the new leaves looked. They certainly looked edible, but I have not tried them before, so I've gone and done some research. This is what I found.




  • Fig leaves are well and truly edible.
  • Fig leaves add a lovely coconut, walnut, vanilla flavour to food.
  • Don't bother with the really old ones - way too fibrous and bland.
  • Fig leaves are a good source of vitamin A, B1, and B2. They also contain calcium, iron, phosphorus, manganese, sodium, and potassium. 
  • There are many health benefits from consuming fig leaves and drinking fig leaf tea: anti-diabetic, lower triglycerides, for bronchitis to name a few
  • Take care with the sap when harvesting, it can irritate.
  • Make fig leaf tea. Dry fig leaves can be used as a tea just as you normally brew tea leaves. You can also use the fresh leaves. Boil them up for 15 minutes and strain. 
  • Cook up fig leaves in lightly salted water for 20 minutes or until tender, then use as a wrap or spinach green alternative.
  • Use fig leaf as a wrap. The leaves add a great mediterranean flavour to food when wrapped and cooked. Fig leaves can be used  to wrap rice and vegetables, or to wrap fish. 
  • Cook up a vegetable curry with big leaves in it. Remove the leaves at the end. The leaves add a lovely flavour.
  • Leaves can also be added to slow cook stews or soups as a spinach alternative.
  • The first record of fig leaves being used as a food wrap is in 3rd century BCE. Fig trees are thought to have originated in the middle east and first cultivated in Egypt. They flourish  areas with a mediterranean climates - hot dry summers and mild winters. They are however found everywhere except Antarctica.



I would be very interested to hear what you know about eating fig leaves. 


Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.


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If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.

Saturday, 4 November 2017

How to simply propagate pineapple - a great perennial in a permaculture plot (includes 3min film)


I've got pineapples growing all around my permaculture garden, particularly as an understory in my food forest areas. They are protected there from frost, and this layering of plants helps to make best use of space. I love pineapple and so do my kids. They are really easy to get started (instructions below).

When I first discovered how pineapple grew, I was amazed. I grew up thinking fruit came from trees. This amazingly delicious fruit actually comes from a bromeliad - a low growing, quite prickly leafy plant. Pineapple is in fact the only bromeliad that is cultivated for food.

Pineapple is so versatile. It is great in savoury and sweet dishes, but certainly the best way to eat it is raw and freshly chopped.

Eating pineapple straight from the garden is so extremely delicious. It's no wonder it is one of the most popular tropical fruits in the world. Growing pineapple at home requires patience though. It takes 18 months to 2 years to get a fruit, so it's a good idea to keep planting new ones to have an ongoing supply.

Columbus took pineapple (Ananas comosus) from the West Indies to Spain 500 years ago.  Back then in Europe, pineapples were a fruit only the wealthiest elite could afford - now massive monocultures mean that it has become the 12th most consumed fruit in the world. 





I much prefer to grow my own or buy from local farmers because there are a few downsides of the pineapple industry. They are usually grown in large scale monocultures with high inputs and lots of chemicals.  Globally, these monocultures are typically controlled by a handful of companies. In many parts of the world, large pineapple monocultures mostly employ migrant workers to plant and harvest. The environmental and human cost is high.

So if you live in a warm humid climate, get some pineapple going in your garden. Pineapple is a short-lived perennial and is surprisingly easy to grow in frost free areas of the tropics and subtropics.


How to propagate pineapple (super easy!):



  1. take a top from a store bought pineapple
  2. remove any fruit flesh
  3. remove a few of the bottom leaves - you can see some tiny root tips forming there
  4. leave it for a couple of days so the stump dries out (and therefore doesn't rot in the ground)
  5. plant it in the garden or in a large pot
  6. when your pineapple ripens, harvest it, chop the top off and replant - the cycle continues



A diversity of uses for the pineapple plant beyond food...

In a permaculture home and garden, pineapples have quite a few other uses besides food.
  1. water-harvesting: the leaves harvest water and make the little reservoirs
  2. habitat creating: these water reservoirs create habitat for invertebrates 
  3. can create a prickly border to keep animals from an area
  4. soil protection as an understory crop in heavy rain areas
  5. medium quality roughage for ruminants (https://www.feedipedia.org/node/675) - green leaves and pulp
  6. pineapple waste from peeling and coring (30%) can be used in compost and worm farms to improve the soil
  7. indoor air purifier: place a pineapple in each room to removes new paint fumes and formaldehyde off-gassing 
  8. turn fibre from leaves into handmade paper
  9. interestingly, pineapple leaves are now being developed into a type of leather too (http://animalsaustralia.org/features/pineapple-leather.php)

Happy gardening. Feel free to share this post.


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If have enjoyed my blog and youtube channel, you may like to consider becoming my patron too. I think of it like a subscription to a magazine you like - but this one is online. From $1/month, you can be part of my the Our Permaculture Life supporter network. Click here to find out more:  https://www.patreon.com/moraggamble.